To build a strong and empowered Filipino community by organizing constituents, developing leaders, providing services, and advocating for policies that promote social and economic justice and equity.

Click below to Register to Vote Online:

Recent News and Events
view all

Refuge for Migrant Children Displaced by Poverty, War and Violence

BORDER-ss-slide-NI7R-jumbo

The desperation of poverty, violence, and separation is causing families to risk the dangerous journey from Central America to the US border to protect their children. This is yet another manifestation of the global displacement of people by decades of war, natural disasters, drug violence, and crushing poverty.

The White House has responded by asking Congress for nearly 4 billion dollars for more enforcement, instead of sending the children to the Department of Health and Human Services for services or releasing them to their families, as the law now requires. The President wants to expedite deportation of the children: “Additional steps to enhance enforcement and removal proceedings … will allow ICE to return unlawful migrants from Central America to their home countries more quickly.”

This is an injustice. Four billion more for streamlining deportations, is not the humanitarian response we need. We should instead provide refuge for those children who are the victims of our government’s past destructive policies. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) have undermined local economies in Mexico and Central America for decades. When NAFTA took effect in 1994, 4.6 million people born in Mexico lived north of the border. Now it’s about 12.5 million. And more have come from Central America because of wars the U.S. promoted in the 1980s, and our disastrous ‘war on drugs’ that has included U.S. support for the military and police in those countries. These are the real causes of migration for which the US bears significant historical responsibility.

We call on President Obama to act on the side of human rights and justice. The US has a responsibility to respond with access to due process, refuge and support. Our starting point should be what is in the best interests of the children. They should not be placed in detention. They should not be deported back to the unsafe and poverty stricken conditions from which they are fleeing. These children should be provided refugee status and reunited with family members.

Expedited removals and more deportations will not alleviate this humanitarian crisis. The real solutions lie in ending NAFTA and CAFTA, and ending support for the military and police disguised as a ‘war on drugs’.

We welcome and commend Mayor Stephanie A. Miner of Syracuse, New York for offering sanctuary for the migrant children and pointing to the need to address the “ . . . larger global issues causing them to leave home . . .” We call on other cities will do the same.


TPS for the Philippines

10403015_10202086610470753_9103876721626424908_n

It is typhoon season again and the Philippines was battered yesterday by typhoon Rammasun, called Glenda in the Philippines. Victims of last November’s super typhoon Haiyan last were not spared. Thousands of people living in tents and other temporary housing were evacuated to higher ground to escape the destructive powers of high winds and flooding.

The long-term recovery continues. The Filipino people continue to need Temporary Protected Status from the US government to help in that recovery.

CALL THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY: 1-202-282-8495
Give you name, city, state and message:
“Approve TPS for Filipinos. It’s a vital part of typhoon relief and recovery for the Philippines.”


Save The Date for Filipino Flashback Friday

FAJ Flier final-page-001

You are invited to join us at our 41st annual event: Filipino Flashback Friday! Celebrate over 4 decades of empowerment and fighting for social justice, as we honor trailblazers in the Filipina/o community!

We will be honoring Allyson Tintiangco-Cubales, Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University.  She is the founder and continues to direct Pin@y Educational Partnerships (PEP) an innovative Fiipina/o American Studies curriculum and teacher training project that has served hundreds of high school, middle school, and elementary school students primarily from low-income backgrounds.

We are also recognizing the work of cultural innovators who channel their social justice principles through their art. Kiwi & Bandung 55, GroovMekanex, Anna Maria Flechero, Noel Catura, Mighty4

Our MC is Dawn Mabalon, Associate Professor at San Francisco State University and author of “Little Manila is in the Heart”.

Go to BrownPaperTickets  to purchase tickets, tickets for individuals are $55/each.

Click HERE to become a sponsor and download the sponsorship levels & instructions.  Or call Judith at 510-465-9876 for more information.

Visit the Facebook Event Page


ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE SOLEDAD FERNANDEZ SCHOLARSHIP

Deadline April 15, 2014

1475913_702139313138239_263450780_n

 

Filipino Advocates for Justice (FAJ) was started in 1973 in Oakland and opened a second office in Union City.  FAJ’s mission is to build a strong and empowered Filipino community by organizing constituents, developing leaders, providing services, and advocating for policies that promote social and economic justice and equity.

The Soledad Fernandez Scholarship is a philanthropic project of one of FAJ’s founders, Cora Tellez. The $5,000 scholarship is a project of the Tellez family who were inspired by Soledad Fernandez’s “zest for life and love for her family” among other qualities.  Soledad provided loving care for Cora and Pablo’s infant son for which the Tellez family is eternally grateful.

Soledad (“Tita” to the Tellez family) came to America after World War II with three young children. She was joining her husband who preceded her to the United States. Her excitement at finally joining her husband and starting a new life together was short-lived. A month after her arrival, her husband died, making her the sole breadwinner for her family.

While college-educated with a degree in teaching, Tita was unable to find work in her profession. She finally found employment as a cafeteria worker at Treasure Island.  There, she worked hard, made many friends, and with her earnings, managed to support her family, buy a house, and send all three children to college.

Tita was not one to dwell on her personal sacrifices or the hardships she faced.  Her gentle smile said it all – persevere and transcended whatever hardships Life presented her. Her faith in her self and the universe made her a pillar of strength for her family and her friends.

The Tellez family first met Tita when she was 74 years old. Remarkably, she volunteered to care for our infant son and he was cherished and loved as though he were Tita’s own grandson. We were struck by her zest for life, her love for her family, her intelligence, her intellectual curiosity, her interest in people, and her all-consuming love for baseball!  She spoke three languages fluently. Her home was the gathering place for friends, families and newly arrived Filipinos seeking opportunities in America.

A woman of grace and courage, Tita was always interested in young people – what they thought of the world, how they saw life and trends. She was also very interested in how young people in America are coping with the opportunities and challenges presented to them. Tita was proud of being a Filipina in America.

 

SOLEDAD FERNANDEZ SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

Eligibility requirements:
Filipino descent (Full to 50% Filipino)
Cumulative GPA of B (3.0) or higher
Reside and attend high school in the SF Bay Area
If selected, attend an award ceremony and luncheon with the Tellez and Fernandez families

Note:  Gather #3, #4 and #5 asap (below) to have them ready to submit by the deadline date.  Mail the package to:

Filipino Advocates for Justice
310 – 8th St., Ste 306
Oakland, CA  94607
attention:  Scholarship

1. Cover Letter including the following:
a. Personal Information:
Name
Address
Phone Number
Email Address
Gender
Date of birth
Place of birth
b. Name of High School you are attending; name of college you will be attending

2. Essay – Statement of interest in the scholarship limited to 2 pages, single-spaced, typed or printed, include the following:
a. How are your values and personal characteristics similar to those of Soledad Fernandez?
b. Demonstrated sense of social justice, equality, or compassion for the less empowered or marginalized of society.
c. Demonstrated community service experience
d. Demonstrated economic or financial need
e. What do you hope to do with your college education?

3.  Transcript of Academic Records directly mailed by high school to FAJ

4.  FAFSA or Guardian’s Income Tax Return

5.  Letter of Admission to an accredited college or university.
(Community College is acceptable, but grant is $2,500.)


International Women’s Day Celebration March 8th

CA DW 030814 English-01

Saturday, March 8th, 12-3:00 pm

Dignity in Action: International Women’s Day Celebration

Location: 5th Street at Minna, San Francisco

Celebrate International Women’s Day by honoring the leadership of the many women who made this victory possible. Artists, community members, and workers are invited to participate in California’s first-ever “Fair Care Coloring Competition,” play their hand at Domestic Worker Bingo, help create audio episodes for the Domestic Worker App (accessible by any kind of phone), and dance to the NannyVan Jams.


Week of Public Engagement for TPS

R2R headerDHS INVITES PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT ON TPS FOR FILIPINOS

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which oversees the implementation of immigration law, is considering our request for Temporary Protected Status for Filipinos.

DHS is calling the week of Feb. 24th to 28th  a ‘week of public engagement for TPS for the Philippines’.  DHS wants to hear from the public that we support TPS for Filipinos.

Please take a minute NOW to call the DHS comment line at 1- 202-282-8495 and Tweet DHS @DHSgov
Say:  Please grant TPS for Filipinos.  TPS is vital to the long-term recovery from Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines.

Why should the Philippines be designated for TPS?

  • On Friday, November 8th, Typhoon Haiyan – one of the most powerful storms ever recorded on land – hit the Philippines, bringing sustained winds of 147mph and waves as high as 45ft. An estimated 6.9 million people have been affected by the storm. Relief efforts are just beginning as debris is slowly being cleared from access roads and airports begin to re-open. The death toll is estimated to be in the thousands while the number of people displaced by the massive storm rises into the hundreds of thousands. The long term impacts of the storm are still yet unknown.
  • It would impose a great burden on the rescue and restoration effort in the Philippines to require the country to reabsorb its nationals from abroad, many of whom may have homes that were destroyed by the Typhoon. TPS exists to provide a safe haven for those who are reluctant to return to potentially dangerous situations, and to assist nations who are under extraordinary and temporary conditions and face difficulties in receiving their nationals safely.
  • A grant of TPS would allow Filipinos here in the U.S. to work and support their families in the Philippines who were impacted by the Typhoon. Remittances account for almost 10 percent of the Philippines’ Gross Domestic Product. Now, more than ever, those funds are needed to help support the recovery process.

Free Immigration Clinic This Friday

Call today to schedule an appointment, please call 510-465-9876 and speak to Judith.

00001

 


TPS for Filipinos

UNited We DREAM TPS new

For the next few days, the TPS (Temporary Protected Status) for Filipinos Campaign (which is like DACA) is focused on calling the Secretary of State John Kerry at the State Department.

Because the message lines are filling up, please ask the operator to connect you to an open message line.

Call:  1-202-647-4000
Press 4 and ask for a line that will accept messages for Secretary Kerry:
Please leave a voicemail message:  “Hello, I’m (say your name), from (say your city and state).  I’m calling to urge you to ask the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to designate TPS for all the Philippines.  TPS will help the Philippines through the long recovery from typhoon Haiyan that lies ahead.”

What is Temporary Protected Status (TPS)?

Under INA section 244, The Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) may designate a country, or portions of a country, for TPS when conditions exist such as an ongoing armed conflict or an environmental disaster in the country that temporarily prevents the country’s nationals from returning safely. While not required, typically a country must first request TPS before the Secretary will make a designation. Once a country receives a TPS designation, nationals of that country residing in the U.S. receive a temporary, humanitarian form of relief from deportation that does not include the granting of permanent residence. The initial TPS designation lasts for a period of 6 to 18 months and can be extended if conditions continue to support the designation.

How would the Philippines get a TPS designation?

The decision to designate a country for TPS rests with the executive branch of the federal government. Congress does not vote on it, though members of Congress may ask the President to designate a particular country. However, it is up to the President and his agencies to make the final determination.

      To start the process the Philippine government should make the request of the U.S. government through its diplomatic channels. After the request is made, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the appropriate agencies such as the Department of State, will then decide whether to grant the request. The designation only becomes effective once it is published in the Federal Register.

Why should the Philippines be designated for TPS?

  • On Friday, November 8th, Typhoon Haiyan – one of the most powerful storms ever recorded on land – hit the Philippines, bringing sustained winds of 147mph and waves as high as 45ft. An estimated 6.9 million people have been affected by the storm. Relief efforts are just beginning as debris is slowly being cleared from access roads and airports begin to re-open. The death toll is estimated to be in the thousands while the number of people displaced by the massive storm rises into the hundreds of thousands. The long term impacts of the storm are still yet unknown.
  • It would impose a great burden on the rescue and restoration effort in the Philippines to require the country to reabsorb its nationals from abroad, many of whom may have homes that were destroyed by the Typhoon. TPS exists to provide a safe haven for those who are reluctant to return to potentially dangerous situations, and to assist nations who are under extraordinary and temporary conditions and face difficulties in receiving their nationals safely.
  • A grant of TPS would allow Filipinos here in the U.S. to work and support their families in the Philippines who were impacted by the Typhoon. Remittances account for almost 10 percent of the Philippines’ Gross Domestic Product. Now, more than ever, those funds are needed to help support the recovery process.

 

 


Free Bi-Monthly Immigration Clinic for Low Income Families and Individuals

00001


Never Underestimate the Difference One Person Could Make in the Life of a Future Leader

Donate Now

Microsoft Word - year end appeal draft 2.docx

In 2013, your support made it possible for FAJ to:

  • Help win a first ever domestic worker bill of rights in California, by developing caregiver leaders and organizing the broader community.
  • Youth leaders win a commitment from the Union City City Council to remodel, and reopen a closed youth center for after school youth activities.
  • Provide prevention education and after school leadership and cultural/art activities for nearly 150 youth.
  • Assist low wage workers win wage theft cases that netted over $300,000 in unpaid minimum and overtime wages.
  • Participate in the national campaign for fair and just immigration reform based on human, civil and workers rights.
  • Contribute to relief efforts for survivors of Typhoon Haiyan including a petition for US long-term commitment to rebuilding the Philippines, climate justice and Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Filipinos so they can support family at home.

Help Filipino Advocates for Justice lay the foundation for the next 40 years.

Donate Now




» powered by radicalDESIGNS